Latest article in Political Behavior on early voting in North Carolina in 2016

Hannah L. Walker, Michael C. Herron, Daniel A. Smith, “Early Voting Changes and Voter Turnout: North Carolina in the 2016 General Election,” Political Behavior (Online June 25, 2018).

Available here.

Abstract

North Carolina offers its residents the opportunity to cast early in-person (EIP) ballots prior to Election Day, a practice known locally as “One-Stop” voting. Following a successful legal challenge to the state’s controversial 2013 Voter Information and Verification Act, North Carolina’s 100 counties were given wide discretion over the hours and locations of EIP voting for the 2016 General Election. This discretion yielded a patchwork of election practices across the state, providing us with a set of natural experiments to study the effect of changes in early voting hours on voter turnout. Drawing on individual-level voting records from the North Carolina State Board of Elections, our research design matches voters on race, party, and geography. We find little evidence that changes to early opportunities in North Carolina had uniform effects on voter turnout. Nonetheless, we do identify areas in the presidential battleground state where voters appear to have reacted to local changes in early voting availability, albeit not always in directions consistent with the existing literature. We suspect that effects of changes to early voting rules are conditional on local conditions, and future research on the effects of election law changes on turnout should explore these conditions in detail.

 

In case you missed opinion pieces (@NYDailyNews and @MonkeyCage) on the right not to vote and the pernicious effects of purging infrequent voters, links here:

NY Daily News: Do we have a right not to vote? The Supreme Court suggests we don’t

The Washington Post: If more states start using Ohio’s system, how many voters will be purged?

Oh, and if you want to hear a fun account of how we took a successful stab at partisan gerrymandering in Florida, have a listen to this @PlanetMoney podcast.

Published just in time for #PROGRESSxBISC. “Who Signs? Ballot Petition Signatures a Political Participation” #GNV #LGBT

Who Signs Abstract

My favorite geo-spatial visual is where the registered voters who signed an invalid ballot petition reside. The density of invalid petitions much higher along Gainesville’s city limits.  Many of the petition signers, especially on the west side of the city, clearly thought they lived in the City of Gainesville. Invalid Signatures

Get your copy of the article here.