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Guess it’s time to re-up this classic published in Presidential Studies Quarterly nearly 20 years ago, “Predicting the Outcomes of Presidential Commissions: Evidence from the Johnson and Nixon Years.”

Available here.

I’m wondering whether Trump, while stumping in Pittsburgh, was subconsciously referring to his failed Presidential Commission on Voter Fraud. A senior advisor told CNN that the commission led by Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach, was a “shit show,” and that Vice President Mike Pence viewed the commission “as a shit sandwich,” which as my colleague Michael McDonald explained on the stand last week to Kobach, may be harsh, but really is a term of affection when used on Twitter.

 

HKMS 2017 PRQ Abstract

Available here

And here’s the key figure:

HKMS 2017 PRQ Table 4

“Figure 4 plots the probability a district elects a black lawmaker in the Deep South (left panel) versus the Rim South (right panel) depending on the size of a district’s black population. This figure shows that, in each of the election periods we include, black legislators are elected with smaller black populations in the Rim South relative to the Deep South. This figure does not contain the same probability for districts in the Non-South because, as the coefficients imply, the differences are larger still. In 1993–1995, the probability that a district elects a black lawmaker reaches 0.5 (an even chance) when the black population is between 54 percent and 55 percent in the Deep South. In that same period, the probability a district elects a black legislator reaches 0.5 when the black population is between 49 percent and 50 percent in the Rim South. This 5 percentage-point difference nearly doubles n 2003–2005 (52% to 53% for the Deep South versus 43 percent to 44 percent for the Rim South) and in 2013–2015 (48% to 49% for the Deep South versus 40% to 41% for the Rim South).11 An additional trend this figure reveals is that, in each region, the threshold required to elect a black legislator declined between 1993–1995 and 2013–2015.”

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